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28.01.2020

Theoretical & Statistical Modelling of North Atlantic Sea Surface

28.01.2020

Theoretical & Statistical Modelling of North Atlantic Sea Surface

We kindly invite you to our Open Faculty Lecture “Theoretical & Statistical Modelling of North Atlantic Sea Surface” by Dr Peter Kowalski, Mathematics teacher at Akademeia High School. The lecture will be given on Thursday, 30th January, at 6:30 pm, in our Auditorium.

Modelling the climate system is very complicated due to the different dynamics that are associated with the ocean, land, atmosphere and sea-ice, all of which interact with one another. However, since 70% of planet Earth is made up of water, the most important component in any climate model is that which attempts to describe variations in ocean temperature and ocean circulation.

In this lecture, Dr Kowalski will introduce modelling sea surface temperature, which is the variable climate modelers use to calculate the amount of heat transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere. However, I will not cover formal derivations of any mathematical models of sea surface temperature, as the focus of this lecture is on comparing the output of these models to observations in the North Atlantic using simple statistical measures and by visual inspection of various graphs.

The lecture will be given by Dr Peter Kowalski, Mathematics teacher at our school. As an undergraduate student in Mathematics at University College London (UCL), Peter developed a passion for mathematical modelling and how mathematical models are used to explore real world phenomena. He subsequently went on to complete a PhD in the Department of Mathematics at UCL, which involved using a hierarchy of mathematical models to quantify the effect of dynamical factors, such as ocean circulation, on sea surface temperature. Since the completion of his PhD, Peter has continued to pursue his research interests at Imperial College London. His current research is aimed at discovering new mechanisms that influence the sea surface height on decadal timescales, with a view to furthering our understanding of how the climate system varies.

The event is open to our students, their families and friends, our faculty and staff. If you’re interested in joining us but you don’t attend our school, please send an e-mail to Jakub Rusak jakub.rusak@akademeia.edu.pl.

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